Column
Counterfeit Indian Currencies Seized in Chittagong Port

28 Sep 2015

#

Huge amount of fake Indian currency notes have been found in a container at Chittagong Port. The container arrived on September 20 in a ship from UAE’s Fujairah Port.

Four boxes of the container were stuffed with counterfeit Indian currency notes. The importers declared that the container was carrying ‘home appliances’.

 

Gone are those days when fake Indian currencies would land in India directly from Pakistan. Following international outcry leading to closing down of the Pakistan-India route to pump in fake currency, Bangladesh emerged as the next hub for this mission.
Persons involved in the incident were trying to use Bangladesh as a transit route to take the Indian currency somewhere in India. Six persons arrested in connection with the seizure included one Asadullah, son of Md Mobarak Hossen, a death row convict for war crimes.

 

For a long period Bangladesh was being used as a transit route for pushing counterfeit Indian currencies manufactured, supported and controlled by Pakistan. The fake notes are printed in government security press located in Karachi, Lahore, Peshawar and Quetta. 

 

Gone are those days when fake Indian currencies would land in India directly from Pakistan. Following international outcry leading to closing down of the Pakistan-India route to pump in fake currency, Bangladesh emerged as the next hub for this mission.

With blessings from Islamabad, fake currency rackets have been innovating with each passing day.

 

After the Sheikh Hasina-led government assumed power in 2009, India has received much cooperation from Bangladesh in busting these Islamabad-controlled fake currency rackets operating as part of Pakistan’s covert economic warfare designed to undermine India’s economy.

 

Mohammad Mazhar Khan, Attache of the Consular section of Pakistani High Commission in Dhaka, was detained by Bangladesh police In February  for running an operation to smuggle fake Indian currencies across the border. A senior official of the High Commission intervened to secure Khan’s release and immediate deportation. But strangely enough, Pak Foreign Office kept mum and denied he was involved in any wrong-doing. With blessings from Islamabad, fake currency rackets have been innovating with each passing day.

 

At the second meeting of Bangladesh-India Joint Task Force on fake currency notes held in Dhaka in August, it was decided to draft a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) to combat the menace. Over the last couple of years it was noticed that bulk of fake currency was landing in India through Bangladesh. In a bid to take the fight against fake currency further, Bangladesh and India agreed to utilize the SOP to combat the fake currency menace. Moreover, the SOP would operationalize the MoU signed during visit of the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Dhaka in June, 2015.




Video of the day
More Column News
Recent Photos and Videos

Web Statistics