Column



On way to miraculous development
On way to miraculous development
Bangladesh is now being tagged globally as the “land of impossible attainments”. The country has already achieved the targets set for hunger and poverty-free society under the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The success in poverty reduction has been well acclaimed by the international community. The country will be projected as a focal country in a global initiative to end hunger by 2025 to be launched in the US.

Johannes Zutt, World Bank Country Director for Bangladesh said “Against all odds, Bangladesh lifted 16 million people out of poverty in last 10 years and also reduced inequality that is a rare and remarkable achievement”.

 

Poverty is the single most important socio-economic policy challenge for Bangladesh which is home to a huge population.  Poverty alleviation has therefore been high on its development agenda as is evident in all plan documents. In 46 years Bangladesh has turned from a ‘bottomless basket’ into a ‘full basket case’.

 

Johannes Zutt, World Bank Country Director for Bangladesh said “Against all odds, Bangladesh lifted 16 million people out of poverty in last 10 years and also reduced inequality that is a rare and remarkable achievement”.
In recent years Bangladesh has made significant progress in poverty reduction. Success achieved in this regard is attributable to the present government’s relentless engagement in poverty reduction interventions. By scrutinizing poverty reduction rate for the last five years it can be envisioned that by 2021 when the country celebrates 50th anniversary of its independence Bangladesh would become a country free from extreme poverty.

 

When the Awami League-led government took office in 2009, around five crore people of the country were poor, of which 2.88 crore were in the clutch of extreme poverty. During previous term of the present government, though population growth rate was 1.16 percent on an average, the number of poor and extreme poor came down to around 3.85 crore and 1.57 crore respectively. It is worth mentioning that forty five percent of extreme poor were pulled out of extreme poverty during the last five years.

 

Special emphasis has been laid to make social safety net programmes more target oriented to accelerate poverty eradication. Bangladesh is now on the verge of finalizing the ‘National Social Protection Strategy’ (NSPS). Steps have been taken to prepare a list of hard-core poor and also a ‘National Population Register’ for proper identification of beneficiaries of social safety net programmes.

 

According to Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, the government is presently following four broad principles to formulate various social safety net programmes:

 

  • Enhancing capacity of the ultra-poor to face poverty by providing them with special allowances
  • Creating employment and self employment opportunities for the hard-core poor through micro-credit operations
  • Ensuring food security for the hard-core poor by providing food assistance free of cost or at a nominal cost
  • Creating capacity of the hard-core poor to deal with poverty by providing them with education, training and health-care services.

 

Social Safety Net Programmes address the basic needs of the people namely food, shelter, education and health. The prime programmes covered under this head include Food for Work (FFW), Vulnerable Group Development (VGD), Vulnerable Group Feeding (VGF), Old Age Allowances, Allowances for Retarded People, Allowances for Widow and Distressed Women and Grants for Orphanages.

 

There are also micro-credit programmes, allowances for freedom fighters and so on. Distressed people particularly women, children and disabled persons have been given priority under Social Safety net. There are two categories of Social Safety Net: Social Protection and Social Empowerment. Social Protection encompasses cash transfer allowances, food security, new funds for programmes etc. Social Empowerment encompasses housing and rehabilitation, micro-credit, miscellaneous funds and developmental programmes.

 

The government maintains a variety of social safety net programmes designed to address mainly food insecurity. Some of the prominent safety net programmes include Vulnerable Group Feeding (VGF), Open Market Sales (OMS), Cash for Work (CFW), Food for Work (FFW), Vulnerable Group Development (VGD), Gratuitous Relief (GR) and 100 Days Employment Guarantee scheme.

The government maintains a variety of social safety net programmes designed to address mainly food insecurity. Some of the prominent safety net programmes include Vulnerable Group Feeding (VGF), Open Market Sales (OMS), Cash for Work (CFW), Food for Work (FFW), Vulnerable Group Development (VGD), Gratuitous Relief (GR) and 100 Days Employment Guarantee scheme.

 

Bureau of Statistics reveal that poverty incidence since 1990 has fallen from 60% to around 26% as a result of sincere efforts being made by the government. The government has set a target to bring down poverty to 13.5 percent by 2021. Gender parity has been achieved in Primary and Secondary school enrollment. Infants and mortality rates have fallen by half since 1990 and life expectancy has risen by 10 years since then. Bangladesh is few among the South Asian countries that is on target for achieving most of the Millennium Development Goals and is considerably ahead of target on some indicators.

 

Despite tremendous development achieved in almost all sectors, a section of people being convinced by false propaganda launched by BNP and its associates has been misguided to believe the Awami League government to be corrupt. But even they unhesitatingly admit that the overall developments the country achieved over the last nine years are unprecedented.

 

With the economy growing annually over 6%, living standards rising for most people and the country maintaining stability for the last couple of years, Bangladesh has in recent past been dubbed a development role model having produced consistent progress in economic, social and human development indicators. In continuation of the profound transformation the country has undergone since the Awami League assumed office for the second term in January 2014, the nation has been elevated to the lower middle income status. The country has emerged as the developing world’s biggest success stories in attaining most of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and has set new lessons for the world in achieving the recently adapted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

 

2018 is going to be a tough year for the government which is scheduled to hold the eleventh national election in December or January 2019 on the conclusion of its second consecutive term.

 

Now, besides settling the Rohingya problem which has assumed a menacing proportion, the government has the huge responsibility to complete almost all the major infrastructure projects, particularly the landmark Padma Bridge, an entirely self- funded project, scheduled to come into being by December 2018. The 6.15 km long road-rail bridge, the country’s largest infrastructure project so far, will connect Bangladesh’s south-west to the northern and eastern region.

 

Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina is the architect of this surprising model of development having set the blueprint with her charter of change “Vision 2021”, the manifesto envisaged and declared by her before the ninth parliamentary election held in December 2008. By breaking with orthodox models for progress she has since then been helping to forge a new Bangladesh centered on building a middle income nation by 2021 by the 50th anniversary of independence and a developed nation by 2041.

 

The pace of development activities initiated by the government will be fostered further if Awami League is returned to power again. It has to be borne in mind that massive socio-economic development activities were undertaken when the Awami League came to power for the first time in 1996. But the pace of development and implementation of different projects initiated by the Awami League government came to a naught and suffered a tremendous blow after Awami League was voted out and BNP-Jamaat Alliance came to power in 2001.

 

Keeping this in view and buoyed by the quantum of growth and development already achieved, an overwhelming majority of people appear content to have Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina in charge of the country once again. A poll released by Nielsen Bangladesh in December 2016, echoing previous surveys, gave her an impressive 67% approval rate. Another survey commissioned jointly by British Council, Action Aid Bangladesh and the University of Liberal Arts Bangladesh revealed that 75% youths see the country as a more prosperous nation in the next 15 years under the Awami League government.




Video of the day
Jamuna tv News today 17 november 2017 Bangladesh Latest News Today News Update bd news all bangla
Recent Photos and Videos

Web Statistics